Monday, November 12, 2007

Eyes Wide Open

Ethics in adoption is a hot topic. Ensuring that children are not handled as merchandise, thus making safe and honest adoptions possible, is one of the main goals of reputable adoption agencies. This story ran in the Sunday Chicago Tribune discussing the not-so-stellar reputation of the Guatemala country program. If you're interested in international adoption ethics, this one's worth a read.


5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Why is the amount of money to adopt a child varies with big margins from country to country? One is so high to the sky while the other is down to earth which is acceptable to cover the necessary costs? Is it depends on the baby and for what ground or the distance of the country?

Guatemala, which is close to US, must be the country demands less amount of money because of the distance and the adoption process has well established infrastructure. Paying 20.000,00 only for a lawyer is unacceptable and it damages the principle of adopting a child. Unconditional love from parents and the interest of the baby have to be the centre to the whole issue.

Paying lots of money for one child in one country while paying less to another child in another country, gives an impression the is going on because based of the quality of babies to own them like commodities instead of loving them unconditionally and being parents no matter how/who they are.

Unreasonable and unacceptable amount of money involvement in the adoption process damages the whole issue and it must be confronted from all directions by every possible instruments. Unconditional love and the feeling of parenthood and humanity must take its place.

How mach cost adoption in China, Russia, Guatemala, Ukraine, Ethiopia and the likes? Considering the distance, waiting time and the level of the country( having adequate facilities to process the adoption easily and quickly).

patjrsmom said...

Anonymous,
I can only speak to the costs associated with our agency, at the time of our adoption, in the country of Ethiopia. I know that even within specific country programs the costs vary wildly from agency to agency. Unfortunately, I do not know the specific reasons for this, but as you stated it does give the *impression* that the child is more *valuable* simply because of the cost. However, this being said, I also know families who have adopted from a wide variety of countries, children of all ages and genders, and have varying adoption costs yet all have the same unconditional love for their child. To read more about adoption costs, check my sidebar for Adoption FAQs-"Financing Adoption" or feel free to email me at patjrsmom at yahoo dot com for specific cost information on Ethiopian adoption with our agency.

S. said...

Yes, the title of this post says it all.

jena said...

wow-
all of this is scary to me right now-
We had really hoped to adopt a 4th from Vietnam in the next 2-3 years, and now it's not looking like it will happen.

Thanks again Jane-
you're awesom-

And will you please post a pick of the van that you end up with- I need a good laugh(sorry)

patjrsmom said...

Jena,

Keep the faith. God will finish what He's started in you--it just may not be what or when you expected.

As for the van...as soon as we can find the 15 passenger Chevy Express that it looks like we're getting, I'll post it...or I'll post the picture of my family painting a used school bus in a host of psychedelic paints. Ha Ha!

Jane